Health & Welfare Plans

Seyfarth Synopsis: On Wednesday afternoon, the Senate voted 90-8 to approve HR 6201 without changes. The law generally takes effect no later than 15 days after HR 6201 is signed (expected soon) and would sunset on December 31, 2020.

In somewhat of a surprise move, the Senate voted overwhelmingly to adopt HR 6201 (described here

Seyfarth Synopsis: Late Monday night, the House passed a technical corrections package to HR 6201. While most of the changes related to the Bill’s paid sick leave, unemployment insurance and tax credits provisions (click here for a summary of those changes), there was one small change to the health insurance section: The package clarified that

Seyfarth Synopsis: Late Friday evening, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed a bill (HR 6201) targeted to provide relief for individuals impacted by the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. The bill addresses paid sick leave and the expansion of FMLA. This post, however, is aimed at the provisions applicable to employers’ medical

Seyfarth Synopsis: One of many COVID-19 benefits-related concerns focused on the ability of individuals covered under High Deductible Health Plans to have services to diagnose or treat the coronavirus covered before their deductible is met. The IRS has listened to the concerns and just issued guidance in response.

As aficionados of the benefits space know,

Seyfarth Synopsis: Because everything has a coronavirus angle now….this blog post covers various issues and considerations plan sponsors and administrators should keep in mind as the coronavirus outbreak continues to escalate.

 While this list is by no means exclusive (and may be added to over time), here are a few steps plan sponsors can take

Seyfarth Synopsis: The Director of HIPAA enforcement agency cautions that many covered entities are not meeting the basic HIPAA requirements and sees “low-hanging fruit” for enforcement activity.

The Director of the Office for Civil Rights at HHS, Roger Severino, recently gave an interview to Law360 about his office’s enforcement of the Health Insurance Portability

Seyfarth Synopsis: Recent changes to the federal rules governing confidentiality of substance use disorder (SUD) patient records may require updates to agreements between group health plans and their third-party vendors. Group health plans may be caught up in the changes if they wind up in possession of certain SUD patient records and disclose those records

Seyfarth Synopsis: We previously blogged that the so-called Cadillac tax was movin’ out. Well, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (“PCORI”) fee is moving back in. On December 20th, the President signed the “Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020” (the “Act”), which repealed the Cadillac tax as well as the annual fee on health insurance providers. The

Seyfarth Synopsis: Although it is not law yet, according to the must-pass spending legislation passed by both the House and Senate, it looks like the infamous Cadillac Tax and the Annual Fee on Health Insurance Providers (HIP Fee) will both be repealed for good. Absent any unforeseen circumstances, the President is expected to sign it