On April 23, 2024, the DOL finalized its 2023 proposed package of amendments to the regulations defining who is a fiduciary under ERISA by virtue of providing investment advice for a fee, and amendments to seven existing prohibited transaction exemptions. This latest iteration of the fiduciary rule, the DOL’s third attempt at revising this rule

Seyfarth Synopsis: On March 28, 2024, Washington State’s Governor, Jay Inslee, signed into law a bill that creates a new state-run retirement program called “Washington Saves.”  Under the program, “covered employers” must give “covered employees” the opportunity to contribute a portion of their pay to an individual retirement account (“IRA”) on a pre-tax basis in order to save for retirement. 

Which Employers Must Comply With Washington Saves?

Only “covered employers” must comply with Washington Saves.  A “covered employer” is an employer that:

  • has been in business in Washington State for at least two (2) years;
  • has a physical presence in the State as of the immediately preceding calendar year;
  • does not offer a qualified retirement plan, such as a 401(a), 401(k), 403(b) plan, to their “covered employees” (employees who are at least age 18) who have been continuously employed for at least one year; and
  • employs, and at any point during the immediately preceding calendar year employed, employees working a combined minimum of 10,400 hours (which translates to approximately 5 full-time or full-time equivalent employees.)

Continue Reading Washington Saves; Washington State’s New State-Mandated Retirement Program

Seyfarth Synopsis: Adding to the holiday joy of employee benefits practitioners nationwide, yesterday the IRS issued guidance on several outstanding questions related to SECURE 2.0. At this time of year, we are especially thankful that the guidance was issued on a day other than the day before or following a national holiday.

The so-called “grab

True to form, the IRS released long-awaited proposed regulations during a long holiday weekend. This time they are narrowly focused on the eligibility rules for Long-Term Part-Time employees first introduced under the SECURE Act, and then expanded by SECURE 2.0. But, they did not disappoint, and are chock full of useful and detailed information on

Seyfarth Synopsis: The IRS just announced the 2024 annual limits that will apply to tax-qualified retirement plans. For a third year in a row, the IRS increased the annual limits, allowing participants to save even more in 2024. Employers maintaining tax-qualified retirement plans will need to make sure their plans’ administrative procedures are adjusted accordingly.

In Notice 2023-75, the IRS announced the various limits that apply to tax-qualified retirement plans in 2024. The “regular” contribution limit for employees who participate in 401(k), 403(b) and most 457 plans will increase from $22,500 to $23,000 in 2024. The “catch-up” contribution limit for individuals who are or will be age 50 by the end of 2024 is not changing, and remains $7,500 for 2024. Thus, if you are or will be age 50 by the end of 2024, you may be eligible to contribute up to $30,500 to your 401(k) plan in 2024. These same limitations apply if you work for a governmental or tax-exempt employer and participate in a 403(b) plan.Continue Reading Want to Put More Away in Your 401(k)? Qualified Plan Limits Generally Increase in 2024

Enacted in December 2022, the SECURE 2.0 Act contains over 90 provisions that impact qualified retirement plans. Notably, SECURE 2.0 mandates the adoption of auto-enrollment features for plans established after its enactment. Grab your cup of coffee and tune in to hear Richard and Sarah chat with Matthew Calloway from Mercer, about the effects that

Seyfarth Synopsis: New rules change the method of counting participants for Form 5500 purposes, possibly both eliminating audits and allowing use of the abbreviated Form 5500-SF.

On February 23, 2023, the Department of Labor released its changes to the 2023 Form 5500 filing instructions. Among the changes was a modification of the participant counting

Signed into law in the waning days of 2022, the SECURE 2.0 Act contains over 90 provisions impacting qualified retirement plans. Several of these provisions materially expand how Roth contributions are to be used, that impact employers and participants alike. We are witnessing the Rothification of retirement accounts. Grab your cup of coffee and tune

Seyfarth Synopsis: New IRS guidance suggest that many NFTs may be considered “collectibles,” causing concerns for IRAs and individually-directed accounts under a tax-qualified plan.

On March 21, 2023, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued Notice 2023-27, announcing that the Treasury Department and the IRS intend to issue guidance with respect to the treatment

The Internal Revenue Code provides significant tax benefits for both employers and employees participating in a 401(k) or 403(b) plan. In exchange for these tax benefits, the plan must satisfy a litany of requirements, notably that a plan be administered in accordance with its plan document. Failure to do so could result in the plan’s