Seyfarth Synopsis: As previously reported here, on December 20, 2023, the IRS issued Notice 2024-2 (the “Notice”) providing guidance on several outstanding questions related to provisions under SECURE 2.0. This blog post summarizes the guidance under the Notice for in-service distributions to terminally ill employees that qualify for a waiver from the 10%

Seyfarth Synopsis: Under Section 604 of Secure 2.0, sponsors of 401(k), 403(b) and eligible governmental plans may allow employees to designate employer match (including match on student loan repayments) or nonelective contributions as Roth after-tax contributions at the time they are made. This provision was effective for contributions made after December 29, 2022 (i.e., the date Secure 2.0 was enacted). Since the issuance of Secure 2.0, a number of questions relating to this optional provision have been lingering. As previously reported here, on December 20, 2023, the IRS issued Notice 2024-2 (the “Notice”) providing guidance on several provisions under Secure 2.0, including Section 604.  A brief overview of the guidance issued relating to designated Roth employer contributions is provided below. 

Are plans required to allow employees to elect to make Roth employer contributions?

No.  The Notice clarifies – as we expected – that plans may, but are not required to allow participants to designate employer matching and/or nonelective contributions as Roth.  This is the case even if the plan allows employees to make Roth employee contributions.Continue Reading “SECURE-ing” the Answers to Outstanding Questions on the Rothification of Employer Contributions  

On November 24, 2023, the IRS issued highly anticipated proposed regulations concerning the provisions under SECURE and SECURE 2.0, requiring 401(k) plans to expand deferral eligibility for long-term part-time employees. The proposed rules answer a number of burning questions that have been lingering since 2019 when SECURE was first enacted. In this special episode, Seyfarth

True to form, the IRS released long-awaited proposed regulations during a long holiday weekend. This time they are narrowly focused on the eligibility rules for Long-Term Part-Time employees first introduced under the SECURE Act, and then expanded by SECURE 2.0. But, they did not disappoint, and are chock full of useful and detailed information on

Enacted in December 2022, the SECURE 2.0 Act contains over 90 provisions that impact qualified retirement plans. Notably, SECURE 2.0 mandates the adoption of auto-enrollment features for plans established after its enactment. Grab your cup of coffee and tune in to hear Richard and Sarah chat with Matthew Calloway from Mercer, about the effects that

Signed into law in the waning days of 2022, the SECURE 2.0 Act contains over 90 provisions impacting qualified retirement plans. Several of these provisions materially expand how Roth contributions are to be used, that impact employers and participants alike. We are witnessing the Rothification of retirement accounts. Grab your cup of coffee and tune

In December 2019, The Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act (SECURE Act) was enacted and signed into law. The Act was the most significant piece of legislation impacting employee benefit plans since the Pension Protection Act in 2006, and includes a plethora of changes to the laws governing employer-sponsored retirement plans, specifically impacting

Seyfarth Synopsys: On September 26, 2022, the IRS issued Notice 2022-45, extending the deadline for amending retirement plans and individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”) for optional changes under the CARES Act.

As we discussed in our prior blog post [here], on August 3, 2022. the IRS issued Notice 2022-33, extending the deadlines for amending

Seyfarth Synopsis: The IRS recently sought to reassure employers that they will not jeopardize their retirement plan’s tax qualified status if they permit employees who have a bona fide separation from service to take a distribution from their retirement plan, even if they are rehired shortly thereafter by the same employer. The reassurance comes in

Seyfarth Synopsis: The SECURE Act, passed at the end of 2019, significantly altered the retirement landscape. Now, proposed legislation, “SECURE Act 2.0,” sets out to make even more changes. As before, several of the proposed provisions will require employers to closely consider the new rules. For newly established plans, there will be requirements that did